In 2001 Gardner/Fox completed a gut renovation of a 30 year old 50,000 office building to create the new corporate headquarters for Brokerage Concepts International, in King of Prussia. The building was originally designed and built for the Hewlett Packard Company and was very dated in appearance inside and out.

The goal of the project was to create an entirely new building that expressed the professionalism that Brokerage Concepts wanted to convey to their customers, as such, all of the interior and exterior finishes used during the renovation were of the highest quality. Some of the features in the building included a data center, telescoping main corridor featuring interesting art, a two story glass entry lobby, an employee fitness center, several board rooms, open offices and interesting seating areas and alcoves. The renovated building was designed to accommodate three times more employees than the original facility. All of the electrical, mechanical, telecommunication systems and life safety systems were replaced with new, state of the art equipment.

As part of the exterior re-cladding of the building approximately half of the existing exterior walls were removed to broadcast natural light into the building interior.  The increased occupancy required the parking areas to be re-planned, expanded, and paved to include an additional 230 extra spots.

In 2000, The Wellness Community, a non-profit group dedicated to helping cancer patients and their families, decided that they wanted to make the historic Ridgeland Mansion their new home. The problem was that the accompanying barn on the property was in structural disarray and the mansion itself was not structured as an office/meeting facility. Luckily, Gardner/Fox was able to help The Wellness Community create a perfect space to fit their needs.

The first portion of the renovation was to the barn. Having to repair the foundation and basic structure of the barn meant that most of the exterior decorative elements and interior were stripped away. In order to maintain the historical integrity of the space, Gardner/Fox replicated the original exterior finishes over the new structurally sound facility. Inside the barn a new multi-purpose room, conference room, catering kitchen, bathroom, and second-floor apartment were created.

The exterior renovations to the mansion itself included the installation of a new asphalt shingle roof and the conversion of the rear porch into a sunroom/activity area. Inside, we renovated and updated the bathrooms, and well as completed the installation of a ducted split system central air conditioning system. The final portion of the renovation included the paving of a new parking lot, installing exterior lighting, and putting in an all new septic system.

Although The Wellness Community no longer occupies Ridgeland Mansion, you can still visit! The mansion and barn are now open to visitors, so stop by and have a look!

This month Gardner/Fox broke ground on it’s newest dealership renovation projects, Porsche of Conshohocken.

Previously, the dealership was occupied by both Audi and Porsche, but with the new Audi of Wynnewood opening, the owner decided to transition the dealership exclusively to Porsche.

During the renovation, we will be transforming the Audi portion of the dealership, into a pre-owned Porsche facility. This includes upgrading finishes, renovating service bays, and converting what used to be an exterior drive-through area into an enclosed vehicle service drop-off location. The exterior renovation will consist of a whole new façade, made of a single piece of curved steel! We’ll have more updates to come, so check back soon!

Gardner/Fox has worked with many different luxury car brands over the years, such as Audi, Porsche, Lincoln, Maserati, etc. We had to get our start somewhere, and that start was with Don Rosen Porsche Audi of Conshohocken, in 1999.

The construction to the Conshohocken dealership consisted of an all-new 8,900 square-foot Audi exclusive addition that included a showroom, sales, accessory boutique, and service writer area. It featured a twelve-foot high ceiling, marble and granite floors, and custom casework.  In the service area, the addition provided the dealership with the space to build five new state-of-the-art (for the time) services bays, two wash bays, and a new parts area.

Coincidentally, the dealership is under construction now, but still open for business! Stop by and take a test drive!

JFK airport is the fifth busiest in the country, which makes the JFK Radisson hotel one of busiest by default. Built in 1971, this 12 story hotel, constructed on top of a 2 story parking garage, was in need of extensive interior and exterior renovations in 1998.

At the time, this project was the largest in Gardner/Fox history.  The interior renovations included gutting the guest room floors to demising walls and corridor walls.  Vertical penetrations including stair towers and elevator shafts were retained.  The building’s heating and air conditioning systems were replaced with new water source heat pumps and the boilers serving the heat pump systems and domestic hot water were replaced.  The elevators were substantially renovated, receiving new motors, cabs and controls.

Public areas, such as the lobby, restaurant, bar, ball room, fitness center, and administrative offices were also gut renovated. Each of these locations required extensive hardwood detailing, and cosmetic upgrades to meet the requirements of the Radisson Hotel company.

Concerning exteriors, every surface on this 12 story building was replaced.  This included recladding the walls, new windows, new decorative architectural elements, roof surfaces, and parking decks.

New York City is known as the city that never sleeps, and on this project, neither did Gardner/Fox. We worked around the clock and completed the renovations for a phase occupancy in 8 months.

After opening a small art gallery on Ridge Ave 10 years ago, business owners Tina Rocha and Michael Kowbuz jumped on the chance to purchase the building next door. After exhibiting the works of hundreds of local artists and artisans, they knew that it was time to expand their space. Although the neighboring building was dilapidated and in dire needs of a renovation, they had a vision, and set out to create the perfect addition to Cerulean Arts.

The space had fallen into a state of disrepair, after being abandoned for years, so before construction could even begin, we had to clear out debris, flooring, ceilings, and windows.

After the space was clean, we began by demolishing the set of stairs in the back of the building. This created a clear and open venue. A new staircase was built in the breeze way. The stairs lead to the second floor, which in the future, will be comprised of six apartments for artists who plan to exhibit work in the gallery. To make the space safe for public use, it required the installation all new electrical, mechanical, security, and safety systems.

After technical installations, new partitions were strategically placed to create a workroom in the back of the gallery, as well as lavatories in the front. The demountable partitions were used to define different exhibit areas, but allow the gallery to remain as a single space instead of six separate rooms.

After the walls came the new gypsum wallboard ceiling, which is painted, you guessed it, Cerulean Blue. The suspended acoustical ceiling that lines the main corridor of the space provides extra spotlight for artwork, while doubling as cover for the mechanical fixtures beneath.  The new track light fixtures are movable, and allow the owners to spotlight any piece of are they are exhibiting in the space, without worrying about wall placement or size. A new glass storefront, along with new windows and doors in the front and back, allow natural light to permeate the space.

Stop by at Cerulean Arts if you find yourself in Philadelphia! The new addition is open and exhibiting artwork now! To find out more, visit them at www.ceruleanarts.com

 

The expansion of St. Peter’s Church in Coatesville, PA, is well on its way toward completion! Construction began early this year, and will be complete early this fall. Here is your first look at the new 17,360 square foot Parish Hall!

The center piece of the new addition is the 5,500 square-foot auxiliary gym, which will act as the event hall for the church community. Other components to this addition include a commercial grade kitchen, café, meeting rooms, storage space, and rest rooms. Outside, the facility includes a 2,300 square-foot court yard, and bell tower. Here is a look at the interior floor plan:

Construction will be complete within the next few months, so check back for the finished product soon!

Magee Rehabilitation Hospital opened its doors in 1958 as the first rehabilitation focused hospital in the Philadelphia area. Although they are exclusive to Philadelphia, they have been recognized nationally for their outstanding patient care and service. With a national reputation, it was no wonder they found themselves needing to quickly expand and update their main campus hospital in Center City in the mid-1990s.  This project was quickly followed by an outpatient care center outside of Center City on Delaware Avenue which was completed by Gardner/Fox.

The project included a 3,000 square-foot physical therapy gymnasium, 2,500 square feet of open plan office space, and 3,500 square feet of exam rooms and class rooms. The renovation followed a meticulously planned 6 week occupancy schedule, which allowed the hospital to continue care, during construction. To learn more about Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, you can visit their website here.

In 1996 Gardner/Fox completed a gut renovation of the Triad Building in King of Prussia. This large 4 story office building was in dire need of interior renovations and substantial technology upgrades.  The yearlong project was completed in 4 phases in an occupied building.  The interior of the building features a multi-story atrium lobby with a glass walled elevator and office suites around the perimeter.   All of the suites were completely renovated with current updated finishes and materials.  The building mechanical, electrical and fire suppression systems were also brought up to the building standards of that time.

To celebrate the 4th of July this week, we decided to combine our projects from 1994 and 1995!

In 1993 and 1994 a new healthcare start-up company, Health Springs, began building multi-specialty medical centers around the country. Each facility was approximately 20,000 square feet and included independent suites for OBGYN, radiology, internal medicine, pediatrics, and family medicine. Like most start-ups, the design concepts, standards, programs, building design and construction were completed at a rapid pace. The goal for Health Springs was to develop a “one stop shop” specialty medical facility in each major city in the country.

Gardner/Fox was selected to head up the design and construction teams for both of the facilities being built in the Philadelphia area. The first project was a complete gut renovation of a 120 year old manufacturing plant on Columbus Boulevard. The existing 60,000 square foot facility was demolished, and Gardner/Fox recreated the core and shell for the new facility on the base that was left. This included the construction of a parking garage in the basement, and the multi-specialty medical facility on the ground and second floor.

The second facility was built on Old Busleton Avenue. To create the space for the new medical center, Gardner/Fox demolished abandoned homes that lined the road, creating a clean slate for the new 20,000 square foot facility, which also included surface parking.

Even with the pre-construction demolition and necessary site work, the projects were each completed in an astounding 12 weeks!


In 1995, we continued our work in Philadelphia, but moved on from medical facilities to historic renovations with the Malta Boathouse! If you’ve ever been to the city, chances are pretty high that you’ve seen historic Boathouse Row. Along the Schuylkill River, just west of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the 12 structures have served as club houses to the local rowing community since the early 1900’s. Each is unique in color and design, and light up each night as a visual treat to anyone going on an evening jog along the river, or traveling to the city down I-76.

The Malta Boathouse was built in 1860, and is the home to the Malta Boat Club. The restoration of such a historic facility required extensive design and custom carpentry, to match the Victorian detailing. The project also consisted of the replacement of the exposed timber beams, exterior re-painting, installation of a new roof, and the renovation of the existing kitchen. The boat house is still active and competes in rowing competitions regularly, so if you ever find yourself on the riverfront, stop in!